Don Moore

How Candy Corn Is Made

In candy, candycorn, halloween on October 30, 2010 at 8:44 PM

Halloween is tomorrow, and there’s no better time to talk about candy. Candy is to Halloween what trees are to Christmas. And perhaps no candy is more representative of the holiday than candy corn. In fact, today is National Candy Corn Day (didn’t know there was such a thing? Neither did the author until a few hours ago). Millions of people consume the miniature treats every year without knowing the history behind them, or even what they’re made of.

So… What Are They Made Of?

In case you were expecting something exotic, like radioactive bits of an alien meteor, prepare to be disappointed. The main ingredients, just like they were in the 1880’s, are sugar and corn syrup–hence the name “candy corn”. Other ingredients are added as well, including marshmallow to make the final product soft, and coloring to give candy corn its distinctive yellow white and orange tint.

How Are They Made?

Original candy corn was created by hand. As you can imagine, that was a time consuming process; modern candy corn is created in an automated process. Remember when you used to fill up ice trays with Kool -Aid to make popsicles? It’s like that, but on a much larger scale. Tiny candy corn shaped molds are filled with three different color syrups– one for each color– and left to harden into the finished product.. All those millions of candy corns are then glazed, and put in bags to be sold.

How Much Candy Corn Is Made?

A lot. A single bag like the kind sold at Halloween can hold hundreds of candy corns. When you consider that millions of people buy those kinds of bags year round, not just during Halloween, then you can appreciate the sheer volume of candy corn consumed every year. The best estimates are that 20 million pounds are eaten annually.  That’s the weight of 106,000 average American men. We’re not sure how many cavities that equals every year, but it’s probably a lot.

Happy Halloween everyone!

 

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